Vegan Collard Greens

healthy vegan collard greens
Lizzie Homemaker’s healthier take on collards keeps the classic smokey flavour intact.

We love collard greens.  We adore them.  We can’t get enough of them.  BUT we’re trying to eat healthier and we also have friends and family that are vegan.  I switched up my traditional collards recipe with pleasing results.  The key was keeping that lovely smokey flavour in the recipe that a ham hock or bacon can provide.  Adding a little liquid hickory smoke did the trick.

Vegan Collard Greens

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large red onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 cup veggie stock
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp liquid hickory smoke
  • pinch of red chili flakes (optional)
  • 1 large bunch of collard greens, remove coarse stems and slice

Directions

  1. Add oil to a dutch oven or heavy bottomed pot.  Add onions and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes or so until browned and softened.
  2. Add vinegar, stock, sugar, liquid smoke, and chili flakes (if using), bring to a simmer.
  3. Add collard greens, tossing until wilted (I use tongs to toss)
  4.  Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes.

This recipe can easily be doubled or tripled.

If you have never bought liquid smoke – it’s near the barbecue sauces at the grocery store.  Be warned if you start experimenting with it – a little goes a long way.

Shrimp and Soba Noodle Soup

I love soup.  It is probably the ultimate comfort food.  And often when I am sick or fatigued it is exactly what I want to eat.  On those days I also don’t want to put much effort into cooking.

For this soup you simply toss aromatics into a pot of broth, simmer, cook the add-ins in the broth, garnish, and dig in.

easy faux pho soup by lizziehomemaker asian inspired soba noodles shrimp
This soup is pure comfort food and requires little effort.

Shrimp and Soba Noodle Soup

  • Servings: 2 - 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

For the broth base

  • 2 quarts (8 cups) stock (vegetable, fish, or chicken)
  • 1 inch piece of ginger, minced or finely diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced or finely diced
  • 2 star anise
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce (optional)

Add-ins

  • 160 grams soba noodles (2/3 of a pack)
  • 16 raw shrimp, peeled, tail-on
  • 1/2 cup peas (frozen work fine here)
  • 2 large handfuls of baby spinach

Garnish

  • green onion
  • fresh chives
  • sesame oil
  • black pepper
  • chili peppers (optional)

Directions

  1. Add all the ingredients for the broth base to a stock pot, bring to a boil, then lower heat and gently simmer for 10 minutes or so.  The longer you simmer, the stronger the flavour.
  2. Add soba noodles and bring back to a boil, simmer for 2 minutes.
  3. Add shrimp and peas, simmer for 3 minutes.
  4. Add baby spinach, cook until wilted and noodles and shrimp are cooked through, approx a minute more.
  5. Add garnishes.

This recipe can easily be made vegetarian by using vegetable stock, omitting the oyster sauce, and omitting the shrimp or replacing it with tofu.

Visiting Rochester and the Suffragette Icon Susan B. Anthony’s grave site

Susan B. Anthony and the Women’s Suffrage Movement

Tombstone of suffragette Susan B. Anthony with I voted stickers left during the 2016 US presidential election
Grave site of suffrage icon Susan B. Anthony in Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester. Many people placed “I Voted” stickers on the tombstone after the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

We traveled with our three daughters to Rochester, NY, less than a week after the 2016 U.S. Election. The idea had been that, upon the historic election of the first woman president, the girls would visit Susan B. Anthony’s grave in Mount Hope Cemetery, where people from across the United States had made the pilgrimage to honour her struggle for women’s suffrage. Initially we were disappointed with the outcome of the election because we had imagined that years later our daughters would look back upon this childhood trip as a symbolic moment in a struggle for equality, but we came around to the more important lesson that, had a woman won the election, it would not have meant the struggle was over. Frederick Douglass’ grave in the same cemetery is a stark reminder of that.

The girls were disappointed to have to get out of the car again; we had taken them for a walk in the lovely and accessible Mendon Ponds Park only an hour before, so the idea that we had to go for another walk seemed like unusual punishment. This didn’t set up well for this Little Lesson for the Littles, but we pushed forward. After all, what would Susan B. Anthony have done?

We explained to the girls (ages five and three) that at one time only men could vote. We asked what the girls thought of this. The three year old twins were too busy contemplating the cobblestone road we hiked to hear us, but our eldest responded simply and accurately, “That’s not fair.”

We took this cue to explain Susan B. Anthony’s contribution to the suffrage movement and that, thanks to her among others, men and women are equal under the law, which includes the right to vote. Further research shows that in Rochester in 1872, Anthony was arrested for voting. This underscores the perceived threat she represented to the establishment of the time but my first thought was someone had to provide her with a ballot and a box in order to cast that vote … and it turns out the election inspectors were complicit … and the conspiracy theory begins.

We followed the various groups of people that were travelling to her grave. As we had seen on the news, her grave, a humble stone, was peppered with “I Voted” stickers. We spent a couple of minutes at her grave, took some photos, and headed into Rochester proper for dinner. Over some legit barbecue we carried on the conversation to see what the girls had gained from the experience.

The twins, as expected, were too busy with pulled pork and apple sauce to hear us. Again though, our five year old was sufficiently worldly to consider the impact of what Susan B. Anthony’s work had on our lives today. We asked her what, if anything, she took away from our visit to the cemetery and Anthony’s grave. She replied, simply, “I remember that people who voted came to put stickers on her gravestone.”

When the girls were tucked into their hotel beds that night, we talked about what they actually took away from the visit. We agreed that the brief history lesson we provided was abstract; girls are now equal to boys (although in our home, boys are seriously outnumbered) but what resonated was the contemporary and concrete result: that people who had voted came to see Susan B. Anthony to let her know. We hope to instill in our girls that social justice is not an option; that fighting for what is right – for yourself and others – is an invaluable way to contribute. The fact that our eldest only recalled that people took the time to travel to Mount Hope Cemetery, stickers in hand, to commemorate their right to vote was enough: she saw the impact one person can have on an entire country.

Pear Chia Jam

Lizzie Homemaker breakfast of overnight chia oats topped with a homemade pear chia jam blackberries dried blueberries Newfound Pure wild blueberry powder hemp hearts cacao nibs bee pollen
Overnight chia oats with a hodgepodge of delicious toppings: pear chia jam, blackberries, dried blueberries, wild blueberry powder, hemp hearts, cacao nibs, and bee pollen.

I make a batch of fresh chia jam every week with seasonal fruit. It’s great for topping oatmeal, pancakes, or toast. This week I was able to get my hands on some lovely local pears.  Chia jams are insanely easy to make and so healthy.  Give it a try.

Lizzie Homemaker child fresh local Ontario pears fruit
Local Ontario pears in November! We had to scoop them up when we saw them.

Easy Pear Chia Jam

This fresh jam can be put together in less than 10 minutes. Then you simply pop it in the fridge and wait for it to thicken.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chopped pears (peeled, if you prefer a smoother texture)
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup (optional)

Directions

Cook pears over medium heat for about 5 minutes until the fruit breaks down, mash, then add chia seeds, vanilla, and maple syrup (if using).  Refrigerate for several hours while the chia seeds plump up and thicken the jam.

This recipe can easily be doubled.  Store in fridge for 4 or 5 days or freeze.  Canning is not recommended.

 

Vegan Cream of Carrot and White Bean Soup

A bowl of vegan carrot soup and white bean soup garnished with chopped cashews and carrot tops by Lizzie Homemaker
A hearty vegan cream of carrot and white bean soup.

We picked up some lovely fresh carrots from our local farmers’ market.  It is amazing how much sweeter they are.  Using good carrots and garnishing this soup with some chopped cashews for crunch and fresh herbs really elevates this dish.

Cream of Carrot and White Bean Soup

  • Difficulty: easy
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Pair this hearty vegan soup with a green salad and some fresh bread for a lovely light dinner.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb of carrots, diced
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 inch piece of ginger, finely chopped
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 cups cooked navy beans (or 2 cans of white beans)
  • 1/2 cup cashews
  • 1 quart (4 cups) veggie stock
  • 2 bay leaves

Directions

  1. Add olive oil to a dutch oven, add carrots and onion, cook for 5-10 minutes over medium-low heat until lightly browned.
  2. Add garlic and ginger cook for 2 minutes.
  3. Add remaining ingredients, bring to a boil then lower heat, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.
  4. Remove bay leaves and puree in blender.  Garnish with fresh herbs such as chives, parsley, or carrot tops and chopped cashews.

This soup can be made in advance and freezes well.

My Local Farmers’ Market

A bunch of fresh organic carrots from Lizzie Homemaker's local farmers' market
Cooking with local fresh organic carrots is ideal. The carrots are sweeter and the skins are left on which makes it faster to prepare and more nutritious.

Today was the last day of the season for my local farmers’ market.  I’m incredibly sad to see it shutter its doors and I feel like spring is an eternity away.

I love taking my kids to the market every Tuesday to try and get them excited about healthy food and to gain an appreciation for those that produce the food we eat.

My neighbourhood market has published the following mandate:

“The Trinity Bellwoods Farmers Market mandate is to support and increase access to fresh, local, sustainable, naturally grown and certified organic agriculture.  To educate the community in the food they eat, the source from which it comes and how it is grown and/or prepared.  We like slow food, not fast food and eating at hearth and home with your loved ones”.    TBFM

How can I not be for this?  How can I not want to support this and visit every week?

I also appreciate that these vendors work very, very hard and offer fresh seasonal food that is so much better than what I can get at the grocery store and I am happy to see my money go directly to them.

artisanal cheese, gerkins, olives, baguette
Providence cheese from Monforte Dairy picked up at our local farmers’ market.

This year we bought a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) plan with Monforte Dairy, a lovely artisanal cheesemaker from Stratford.  We will receive a bundle of the most delicious cheese in December and they can count on that revenue.  I want to see businesses like this thrive.  They deserve to.

 

 

I just came across this TED talk.  I’m hoping that my kids will be just as passionate about how our food is produced as this 11-year-old.  Taking them to our farmers’ market is probably a good start.