The Best Dog Biscuits We’ve Ever Made

Lizzie Homemaker Barefoot Contessa Whole Wheat Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits
If you love puppy dogs as much as my littles ones then consider baking these treats for your furry friends and neighbours.  One taste and they’ll be rolling over, playing fetch, and begging for more.

My young ones are OBSESSED with dogs.  I love dogs, too, but am not planning on adopting one anytime soon.  Truthfully – it would push me over the edge.

Every Christmas the kids ask for dog.  And in the summer when they blow on dandelion flowers and make a wish – they always wish that they could have a dog.  Somedays I think I should buck up and make their dreams come true, but in the mean time, I try to support their relationships with our four-legged friends in every way I can.  We’ve spent countless hours at the local make-shift dog park hanging out with local pups.  We always stop to say hello, shake a paw, give a pat, even when it makes us late.  And every Christmas our holiday baking includes gingerbread and dog biscuits.

This year we tried Ina Garten’s (aka Barefoot Contessa’s) Whole Wheat Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits.  This recipe is a winner, the best we’ve made to date – and it was really easy to make.

Barefoot Contessa's Whole Wheat Peanut Butter Dog Biscuits

This adapted recipe comes from Ina Garten's <em>Make It Ahead</em> cookbook. She uses stone-ground whole wheat flour, quick cooking oats, and wheat germ. We used regular whole-wheat flour, large flake oats, and omitted the wheat germ because that's what we had on hand. The biscuits still turned out beautifully and they smelled so good that my kids wanted to eat them.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup powdered milk
  • 1/2 cup large flake oats, plus extra for sprinkling
  • 1/2 cup natural smooth peanut butter
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 extra-large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp water, for egg wash

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325F.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine all ingredients except water and egg.
  3. With mixer on low speed add the water and the egg and mix until it forms a slightly sticky ball.
  4. Dump dough on well-floured board, knead into ball, and roll out 1/2 inch thick.  (We were inconsistent with the thickness and the biscuits turned out just fine.)
  5. Dip cookie cutters into flour and cut out shapes.  Collect scraps, roll out again, and cut out more biscuits.
  6. Place biscuits on baking sheet lined with parchment paper, then brush with egg wash and sprinkle with oats.
  7. Bake for 1 hour.

This recipe is adapted from Ina Garten’s Make It Ahead cookbook.  The biscuits can be made up to a week in advance.  Store in airtight container.

 

 

Salt Dough Ornaments

salt dough ornaments lizzie homemaker
The salt dough ornaments are left to dry after acrylic paint and glitter glue are applied.

We make homemade salt dough ornaments every Christmas.  It’s a lovely tradition that we look forward to every year.

If you have never made them and want to, it is incredibly easy.  Simply mix 2 cups of flour with 1 cup of salt, then mix in 1 cup of warm water. Roll out dough, cut out shapes, poke a hole in the top with a straw, then bake at the lowest temperature that your oven allows until the dough is completely dry. This can take several hours depending on the temperature and the thickness of the dough. Allow the ornaments to completely cool, paint, and add glitter glue if inclined. Lastly, thread a ribbon or string through the hole and tie for hanging.  Done!

ballerina salt dough ornament lizzie homemaker
Lizzie Homemaker’s five-year-old daughter making a ballerina salt dough ornament.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • 1 cup warm water

Directions

  1. In a bowl, combine flour and salt.
  2. Add water and mix together.
  3. Remove dough from bowl and place on counter, shape into ball, and knead with your hands until thoroughly combined.
  4. With rolling pin, roll out dough.
  5. Using cookie cutters, cut out desired shapes.  Using a straw, poke a hole in the top of the ornament.  Continue to combine dough scraps into a ball and re-roll out until dough is used up.
  6. Place ornaments on parchment paper lined cookie sheet.
  7. Bake ornaments at 200F or the lowest temperature that your oven allows until the ornaments are completely dry.  This can take about 2-3 hours depending on the temperature of your oven and the thickness of the dough.  Allow to cool completely.
  8. Paint – we use acrylic paints.  Add glitter glue (if desired).  Allow to dry.
  9. Thread a ribbon or string through hole and tie for hanging.

The ornaments puff up at higher temperatures which is why I recommend the lowest temperature possible.  My old oven could be set to 200 F but my new one only goes as low as 250 F.  A dehydrator can also be used and gives very consistent results.

If the dough mixture is a little dry simply add a tbsp of water at a time until it comes together.  If the dough is too sticky simply sprinkle and knead in a tbsp of flour at time until the dough is no longer sticky.